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A Candidate Value Proposition is more than just a tag line or headline on your resumé. It is the basis for determining what should and shouldn’t be included in your resumé, and how the information should be presented. There are three key components to a Candidate Value Proposition. 1. The Employer’s Motivators Ask yourself: What bottom-line results can the employer expect to see? How will the employer benefit from filling the job? 2. The Candidate’s

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Depending on the job you’re applying for, the person receiving your resumé could be combing through dozens if not hundreds of resumes. From that stack, they’ll likely only select a small handful for an interview. Before you start handing out your resumé to potential employers, take a few minutes to consider whether you’re making any of these mistakes. 1. No Specific Results in Your Resumé If your resumé lists the responsibilities you had at your

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Choosing great references can be key to moving from applicant to interviewee and finally to HIRED. Just because the references normally go at the end of your resumé doesn’t mean they’re not important. If you opt not to include references, at the very least, you should include a “References available on request” line, or I like to write “References gladly furnished upon request.” If a job posting specifically mentions supplying references, make sure you do. If you choose not to include

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Yes it does! In fact, it might matter more than you think. Why? Because an unprofessional e-mail address on a resumé can be a first sign to an employer that you’re not taking your job search seriously. Some e-mail addresses could even cause your application to get picked up by a spam filter and land in a junk mail folder. Here are a few tips for choosing the best e-mail address for your job hunt:

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